I was about 14 when I finally started liking coffee, I needed the caffeine whilst revising for those “stressful” tests. The relationship kept on going through the rest of the teen years so when I got one of my first jobs in a coffee shop that roasts all their coffee beans in house, it was safe to say I was excited. When the time eventually came to leave that job to start my design career properly, the owner of McCoy’s, Mark, needed a new website, so we were off to the races.

Some Background.

Just to give you a bit of a background about the place, it’s based in Hull, England, City of culture 2017 and it sells super fresh food and drink, so fresh the coffee roaster is about two feet away from the espresso machine (I’m sure that’s some sort of world record.) It’s a city favourite to grab an amazing full English breakfast and famed for its eggs benedict. It’s well over 10 years old and has many dedicated, true fans that numbers are growing ever faster.

A classic cup.

It’s from a time when the owner would never really have to think about marketing strategy or brand identity too much because it was already majorly successful when he took it over, he just had to maintain it’s great quality service and produce. It’s also not the kind of place where you see fields of beards and beanies, you can bring your family, you could bring a date or catch up with your grandma, but still has something for the coffee connoisseur. So, it’s got a great mix of customers which made it an interesting design job when it came to refreshing the job.

The Website Design.

Without the foam.

What could a website possibly do for a coffee shop that’s already doing very well? At a certain point, it’s not about increasing business or making more sales, although that will still be a by-product, a website at this point will add extra functionality to the business that makes it a smoother process. For this project, functionality such as a menu that utilises a PDF upload means that the owner can make changes to the menu on the fly and customers can get instant access at home or when they visit.

Pass the menu.

At the end of the day, a customer will really decide to visit a restaurant after checking out these three elements. The first thing they may think about is what’s on the menu and what the prices are like, so having the ability to see the menu as quickly as possible is essential and so that’s why the first button you see links to the menu.

After that they may want to see what the place is like, such as its atmosphere and seating arrangement, so imagery is essential, a gallery is immediately viewable after the menu button. The final element is information about the coffee shop, such as opening times, table bookings and details about their produce, that’s why some great copy as well as an FAQ section that streamlines customer questions.

Refilling the brand.

Original

The first step of the process was quite clear. As mentioned before, it’s well over 10 years old which means it’s from a time when Bradley Hand was a popular font to use (i.e. now a frequent in the “Top Ten worst fonts ever” design blog posts) So I mentioned how we could look at refreshing the logo that captured the style and tone of the place more and came up with some ideas.

New Version

It’s understandable where the previous designer was coming from when he chose this type of font, at least when you think about it. The hand-written style encompassed McCoy’s approach to things, they’re not trying to be Starbucks or Costa (Mostly because they were the original). It was fresh and didn’t feel too privileged or un-approachable. So, I knew it had to have an organic element to it, but introduce an element of warmth. So, I thought using calligraphy would be a great way to go, but keeping the hand drawn element.

Alternative Version

If you’ve ever been in a coffee shop and really look at how much branding is in there, you’ll soon realise some logo alternatives come in handy, whether it’s for a loyalty card, poster or stamp to go on the bag, an alternative version helps. The McCoy’s building is this amazing Victorian era building that would have been used for trading when Hull’s fishing industry was around. When you combine that with all the fresh coffee their roasting and the bags they’re arriving in from brazil and the typeface on them, you get a vintage logo that looks something like this.

See some more work

Ready to tell your story?

That’s enough about me, I want to hear about you, your brand, your goal, whether you prefer tea or coffee (personally, both). If you’re needing a website or brand work that’s great. If you’re an agency or fellow designer having a nosey, drop me a message too! I love working with other great designers and teams of people.

6 + 2 =

Nathan Dennis Design

Full website coming soon.

I was about 14 when I finally started liking coffee, I needed the caffeine whilst revising for those “stressful” tests. The relationship kept on going through the rest of the teen years so when I got one of my first jobs in a coffee shop that roasts all their coffee beans in house, it was safe to say I was excited. When the time eventually came to leave that job to start my design career properly, the owner of McCoy’s, Mark, needed a new website, so we were off to the races.

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See more work

Ready to tell your story?

That’s enough about me, I want to hear about you, your brand, your goal, whether you prefer tea or coffee (personally, both). If you’re needing a website or brand work that’s great. If you’re an agency or fellow designer having a nosey, drop me a message too! I love working with other great designers and teams of people.

1 + 2 =

Nathan Dennis